For A Better Us

March 30, 2016

The Quiet Research that Led to a Resounding Success in Diabetes Prevention

More than 86 million people, including 22 million people 65 or older, have pre-diabetes, which increases their risk of heart disease, strokes or diabetes. As we’ve watched that number grow, it has somehow felt that despite billions of dollars of research and intervention, there’s little we can do. That feeling shifted last week when Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the secretary of health and human services, announced that Medicare was planning to pay for lifestyle interventions focusing on diet and physical activity to prevent Type 2 diabetes. It’s an example of small-scale research efforts into health services that have worked and that have expanded to reach more people.

Read more from The New York Times

When James joined the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program at the First Coast YMCA, he did it for his own health. What James didn’t know was how his participation would affect his family.

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Learn More: Diabetes Prevention at First Coast YMCA

More than 86 million people, including 22 million people 65 or older, have pre-diabetes, which increases their risk of heart disease, strokes or diabetes. As we’ve watched that number grow, it has somehow felt that despite billions of dollars of research and intervention, there’s little we can do. That feeling shifted last week when Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the secretary of health and human services, announced that Medicare was planning to pay for lifestyle interventions focusing on diet and physical activity to prevent Type 2 diabetes. It’s an example of small-scale research efforts into health services that have worked and that have expanded to reach more people. Read more from The New York Times When James joined the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program at the First Coast YMCA, he did it for his own health. What James didn’t know was how his participation would affect his family. Learn More: Diabetes Prevention at First Coast YMCA


March 16, 2016

The Workout You Won’t Skip

Staying on track can be one of the biggest challenges to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But an accountability partner can make all the difference. You’ll be less likely to skip a workout with your friend and can even save money on your YMCA membership!

Invite a family member or friend to join the Y and you’ll both enjoy an exclusive 20% membership savings off of the standard membership rate each month as long as you both remain members*.

Top 5 Benefits of Having a Workout Partner

1. Accountability

Arguably the most worthwhile reason to have a workout partner is accountability. Workout partners hold each other responsible for going to the gym because they keep each other on track and always reaching for their goals. If both go regularly, they will know whether a workout has been missed.

2. Sharing goals and progress

A workout buddy offers companionship, but also creates a competition that can be extremely helpful when someone needs to push through that extra mile or squat. They also give each other someone to celebrate milestones with. Both members can go out to dinner and feel comfortable getting healthy meals without giving in to temptation.

3. Validation

Many people who are trying to lose weight get discouraged because of the rough weeks where weight doesn’t come off. Workout partners can see each other’s progress from the outside and provide motivation, positive feedback and constructive criticism.

2014-06-19_AOF_4533_RGB4. It’s fun!

Workout partners provide a sense of reliability and help transform the gym into something more desirable – an active social gathering. For example, busy mothers would benefit from having someone else who is going through similar life changes. They can provide motivation and support, and it also gives them a chance to socialize away from the family.

5. It Saves You Money

Because we know how beneficial it is to have a workout partner, we are now rewarding you when you refer a family or friend to the Y. You can both save 20% off your membership!

Frequently Asked Questions

When will I begin to receive the Member Referral Rate? Members will receive their member referral rate on their next billing cycle.

How long is the reduced rate valid?
The reduced rate received from participating in the Member Referral program is good for as long as both parties remain members, and their membership is in good standing (by keeping all monthly payments current). Should one of you cancel your membership, the remaining member has thirty (30) days to refer another friend or family member to join. If the remaining member does not refer another friend or family member to join within 30 days, the reduced membership rate will return to the standard rate for the specified membership type.

Can I get more than one discount?
Members are only eligible for one rate reduction on their memberships. Ask an Experience Maker at your Y’s Welcome Center to help you find the best rate.

Will the Member Referral rate ever increase?
Yes, you will still be subject to future rate increases. However, your rate will still reflect a 20% savings as long as both members are still active in good standing, and the Member Referral Program is still being offered by the Y.

Does my friend or family member have to join the same Y?
No. A friend or family member can join any of our Y’s in Florida’s First Coast.

Can I refer more than one friend or family member?
Yes. Members can refer as many people as they would like. In fact, it is to your benefit to refer more than one friend or family member so, in the event one of your referrals decides to leave the Y, you have another referral attached to your membership, which ensures your membership savings stay in place. However, the maximum savings you will receive is 20%.

Who is eligible to participate in this program?
Adult, Senior or Household members who pay on a monthly billing cycle from an EFT or Credit Card.

I am currently receiving financial assistance. Can I refer a friend for this program?
Yes. Should your friend or family member decide to join they will receive the Member Referral membership rate for the membership category they select. Your membership will remain at your standard financial assistance rate or be reduced to the Member Referral rate for your membership type, whichever is less.

Does my friend or family member have to be with me to join?
No. New members will need to bring in the referral email they receive from their friend or family member when they join in order to receive the 20% savings off of their first billing cycle.

Before the Member Referral Program began, I referred multiple families to join the Y. Can I receive a rate reduction based on their memberships?
No. The Member Referral membership savings is only available for current members referring new members. A new member is considered a member that has not been an active member at a Florida’s First Coast Y for 60 days or longer.

I am joining the Y as a new member in the Member Referral Program. Do I have to pay a joining fee?
Yes. You will still be required to pay a full joining fee at the time you join the Y. The 20% membership savings may only be applied to the standard membership monthly dues.

Have more questions? Give us a call at 904.265.1775.

 

 

*The YMCA of Florida’s First Coast reserves the right to end this member referral program at any time. However, if you are already receiving the member referral discount, you will continue to receive the discount as long as you and your family member or friend remain members. Discount can only be applied to two separate accounts. If either of you cancel and the program is no longer being offered, the discount will no longer be valid.

Staying on track can be one of the biggest challenges to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But an accountability partner can make all the difference. You’ll be less likely to skip a workout with your friend and can even save money on your YMCA membership! Invite a family member or friend to join the Y and you’ll both enjoy an exclusive 20% membership savings off of the standard membership rate each month as long as you both remain members*. Top 5 Benefits of Having a Workout Partner 1. Accountability Arguably the most worthwhile reason to have a workout partner is accountability. Workout partners hold each other responsible for going to the gym because they keep each other on track and always reaching for their goals. If both go regularly, they will know whether a workout has been missed. 2. Sharing goals and progress A workout buddy offers companionship, but also creates a competition that can be extremely…


February 26, 2016

Celebrating Community Impact

This week, the community came together at Y-Bash to showcase the Y’s real impact on the First Coast. This year’s event, held February 23 at the Florida Theatre, celebrates the Y’s mission to strengthen community through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility.

The Y named Jacksonville Sports Council as the recipient of the E. William Nash, Jr. Legend Award for the Community Partner of the Year. This year’s honoree for the Carl & Rita Cannon Employee of the Year Award is Jennifer Willett and the Volunteer of the Year honoree is Josh Harrison.

The feature presentation at this year’s Y-Bash was a story connecting the past, present and future with Hi-Y, a high school civics club popular at the Yates Family YMCA from the 1940s to 1980s, and the current Youth in Government program.

At this year’s event, the Y announced its funding priorities for the following year and its goal to raise $1.7 million. This year’s four funding priorities include:

  • Active Adults Creating Healthy Families and Communities
  • Making Kids of All Ages Safe in the Water
  • Academic and Life Achievement for Our Youth
  • Helping Teens Become Leaders

We’d like to say thank you to our Y-Bash Sponsors:
• The LBA Group
• The University of North Florida Foundation, Inc.
• Legal Accounting Solutions
• Haskell
• RS&H
• Prospect Mortgage

This week, the community came together at Y-Bash to showcase the Y’s real impact on the First Coast. This year’s event, held February 23 at the Florida Theatre, celebrates the Y’s mission to strengthen community through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. The Y named Jacksonville Sports Council as the recipient of the E. William Nash, Jr. Legend Award for the Community Partner of the Year. This year’s honoree for the Carl & Rita Cannon Employee of the Year Award is Jennifer Willett and the Volunteer of the Year honoree is Josh Harrison. The feature presentation at this year’s Y-Bash was a story connecting the past, present and future with Hi-Y, a high school civics club popular at the Yates Family YMCA from the 1940s to 1980s, and the current Youth in Government program. At this year’s event, the Y announced its funding priorities for the following year and its goal to raise $1.7 million….


February 25, 2016

MEET ZOE: The Newest Presidential Candidate

YMCA of the USA (Y-USA) today launched Zoe for President, a campaign to elect a one-year-old girl as our nation’s Commander in Chief…in 2064. The campaign highlights the potential the Y sees in all kids to grow up and change the world if they’re nurtured properly and supported along the way. Through Y initiatives like childcare, academic enrichment, mentorship, college prep, job training, and more, kids have the opportunities to succeed, grow, and one day, maybe even become president. The Y aims to impart the values of what it means to achieve—how hard work, determination, perseverance and character can drive someone to success beyond what they thought possible.

Like all candidates, Zoe has her own campaign website, ZoeForPresident.net, where users can donate to her campaign, watch videos of her stance on issues and shop for swag. When users donate to Zoe’s campaign, they are donating to their local Y and supporting the programs and services that enable kids like Zoe to thrive from childhood to old age.

“While Zoe for President is a breath of fresh air during a heated campaign cycle, every child, regardless of background, needs support and guidance to reach their full potential,” said Kevin Washington, president and CEO, YMCA of the USA. “Our campaign will address actual issues that America’s communities are faced with each day like access to early childhood education, safe space, meal assistance, and the Y’s role in solving the challenges head on.”


Zoe In the News:
The Y Nominates Zoe for President
Move Over Clinton, Trump: YMCA Backs a Toddler for President
Still Looking for a Candidate That’s Truly Likable? Meet Zoe
One-Year-Old Girl Runs for President in Latest YMCA Campaign

YMCA of the USA (Y-USA) today launched Zoe for President, a campaign to elect a one-year-old girl as our nation’s Commander in Chief…in 2064. The campaign highlights the potential the Y sees in all kids to grow up and change the world if they’re nurtured properly and supported along the way. Through Y initiatives like childcare, academic enrichment, mentorship, college prep, job training, and more, kids have the opportunities to succeed, grow, and one day, maybe even become president. The Y aims to impart the values of what it means to achieve—how hard work, determination, perseverance and character can drive someone to success beyond what they thought possible. Like all candidates, Zoe has her own campaign website, ZoeForPresident.net, where users can donate to her campaign, watch videos of her stance on issues and shop for swag. When users donate to Zoe’s campaign, they are donating to their local Y and supporting the programs and services that enable…


February 24, 2016

Too Much Sodium in Your Child’s Diet?

Sara Glenn
Director of Strategic Development of Healthy Living Innovations: Nutrition & Obesity for the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast

If you think heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure are only present in adults, think again. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), about one in six children ages 8 to17 years has raised blood pressure.

American Heart Month Kids Sodium Intake Infographic

American Heart Month Kids Sodium Intake Infographic

The Dietary Guideline recommends children eat less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. However, studies show that kids in America ages 2 to 19 eat more than 3,100 milligrams of sodium every day. Eating too much sodium can result in high blood pressure in children and teens, and the effect is greater if they’re overweight or obese.

As a mom, I am always looking for new ways to encourage my kids to eat healthy and stay active. Even with a career in health and wellness, I still have to stop my daughter from emptying the saltshaker. As a partner in the health of our community, we are dedicated to supporting families in the overall health of their children. In celebration of American Heart Month, below are some steps you can take to help reduce sodium in your family’s diet.

Enjoy Home-Prepared Meals

Outsourcing family meals to restaurants may be convenient, but preparing you own foods allows you to control the amount of salt in them. The Nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest analyzed a range of processed foods and found, for instance, ready-made roasted carved turkey contains up to 5,410 milligrams of sodium per serving.

When cooking and preparing meals at home, involve your children. Research shows that the more we include our children in food choice and the process of cooking, the more likely they are to eat a healthy diet. From toddlers to teens, there’s a job for everyone when it comes to preparing meals.

American Heart Month Kids and Sodium Infographic

American Heart Month Kids and Sodium Infographic

Adjust Your Kid’s Taste Buds

Cut back on salt little by little—and pay attention to the natural tastes of various foods. Your kid’s taste for salt will lessen over time. Additionally, keep salt off the kitchen counter and the dinner table and substitute spices, herbs, garlic, vinegar or lemon juice to season foods. Lastly, be aware of the “hidden” sodium in your kid’s everyday foods such as pizza, soups and sandwiches.

Model Healthy Eating

Children are great imitators. Just when we think they aren’t watching or listening, they surprise us with what they know. We can use this to their benefit when it comes to eating healthy. If we, as parents, model low-sodium intake using alternatives to add flavor to our food, then our children will follow suit.

 Look at the Label

 Packaged foods and beverages can contain high levels of sodium, whether or not they taste salty. That’s why it’s important to use the Nutrition Facts Label to check the sodium content.

The percent daily value (%DV) tells you how much of a nutrient is in one serving of a food. The %DV is based on 100 percent of the Daily Value for sodium (less than 2,300 milligrams per day). When comparing and choosing foods, pick the ones with a lower %DV of sodium. As a general rule:

  • 5% DV or less of sodium per serving is low
  • 20% DV or more of sodium per serving is high

The First Coast YMCA offers a community of diverse individuals who can help families to meet their health and well-being goals. The new Healthy Living Centers in Mandarin and Ponte Vedra brings medically integrated programs from Baptist Health into the Y and making these programs more accessible to the surrounding community. Whether you want to talk to a doctor about your child’s heart condition or need advice for adopting a healthier lifestyle, the Y is here to help!

About the Author 

Sara Glenn and DaughterSara Glenn, MEd., is the Director of Strategic Development of Healthy Living Innovations: Nutrition & Obesity for the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast and leads the Y’s nutritional services, including the Y’s vertical garden initiative, SEEDifferently. Sara lives in Jacksonville with her husband and two-and-a-half year-old daughter, Charley, who she is determined to raise as a healthy foodie!

 

Sara Glenn Director of Strategic Development of Healthy Living Innovations: Nutrition & Obesity for the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast If you think heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure are only present in adults, think again. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), about one in six children ages 8 to17 years has raised blood pressure. The Dietary Guideline recommends children eat less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. However, studies show that kids in America ages 2 to 19 eat more than 3,100 milligrams of sodium every day. Eating too much sodium can result in high blood pressure in children and teens, and the effect is greater if they’re overweight or obese. As a mom, I am always looking for new ways to encourage my kids to eat healthy and stay active. Even with a career in health and wellness, I still have to stop my daughter from emptying the saltshaker….


February 10, 2016

First Coast Wins Treadmill Tuesday Challenge!

– More than 3,400 Floridians log 7,449 miles in event to encourage healthier lifestyles –

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Feb. 9, 2016 – The YMCA of Florida’s First Coast is pleased to announce its win in the Treadmill Tuesday Challenge, a competition with the Tampa Metropolitan Area YMCA. Nearly 1,750 First Coast residents completed 3,813 miles during the 12-hour event, surpassing the Tampa Bay by 177 miles. For the Tampa Bay area, 1,686 residents logged 3,636 miles. Together, the First Coast YMCA and Tampa YMCA leveraged a friendly competition to inspire community members to become more physically active and adopt healthier lifestyles.

“Treadmill Tuesday is another way for us to promote the importance of getting 30 minutes of activity or exercise each day, it’s about building a healthy community,” said Eric Mann, president and CEO of the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast. “This year’s competition with our friends in Tampa made the event even more exciting and it’s been incredible to see these communities come together with a cheerful spirit and determination.”

As part of the friendly wager agreed upon by the two YMCA CEOs prior to the competition, Looby will wear a Jacksonville Jaguars jersey, the jersey of the winning community’s NFL team, this week. Additionally, the Tampa YMCA will send a basket of hometown favorites to the YMCA in the winning community.

“The remarkable turnout of the Treadmill Tuesday Challenge has once again demonstrated the importance of community involvement in improving Florida’s health and well-being,” said Tom Looby, president and CEO of the Tampa Metropolitan Area YMCA. “While this year’s competition has come to an end, both communities’ Ys remain committed to strengthening the health of our communities.”

In addition to participating at their neighborhood Y, community members were able to join the competition from other locations via social media. Of the 3,435 participants, more than 65 joined by uploading a post-workout photo of treadmill dashboard displaying the total distance, tagging @FirstCoastYMCA or @TampaYMCA, and using #TreadmillTuesday. The total distance and number of participants for the First Coast YMCA, who joined the competition via social media or at a First Coast Y branch, are listed below.

2016 Treadmill Tuesday Results: Jacksonville Participants Mileage
Arlington 80 132.52
Bank of America Tower 49 123.58
Barco-Newton 168 430.36
Brooks 104 225.99
Dye Clay 140 263.50
Flagler 80 190.99
Florida Blue 64 149.22
Johnson 138 381.76
McArthur 186 301.63
Ponte Vedra 170 370.79
UF Health 24 56.95
St. Augustine 128 237.28
Williams 189 389.51
Yates 188 457.14
Social Media 41 101.54
Total 1749 3812.76


– More than 3,400 Floridians log 7,449 miles in event to encourage healthier lifestyles – JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Feb. 9, 2016 – The YMCA of Florida’s First Coast is pleased to announce its win in the Treadmill Tuesday Challenge, a competition with the Tampa Metropolitan Area YMCA. Nearly 1,750 First Coast residents completed 3,813 miles during the 12-hour event, surpassing the Tampa Bay by 177 miles. For the Tampa Bay area, 1,686 residents logged 3,636 miles. Together, the First Coast YMCA and Tampa YMCA leveraged a friendly competition to inspire community members to become more physically active and adopt healthier lifestyles. “Treadmill Tuesday is another way for us to promote the importance of getting 30 minutes of activity or exercise each day, it’s about building a healthy community,” said Eric Mann, president and CEO of the YMCA of Florida’s First Coast. “This year’s competition with our friends in Tampa made the event even more exciting…


January 29, 2016

Healthy Moms: Sneaking 30 Minutes of Exercise into Your Busy Day

Becoming a mom changes your priorities – suddenly the needs of your children come first, and your exercise routine moves to the bottom of the ever-growing to-do list. Fortunately, there are ways to ensure your personal fitness needs are met, as well as the needs of your family.

Daily exercise is important to promote good health. The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, five days per week. In addition to promoting your overall health, a regular workout can provide you with more energy and reduced stress.

Physical activity is also an opportunity to spend time with family. You don’t have to choose between being a mom and being healthy, you can be a healthy mom! Here are a few tips for incorporating exercise into your family’s daily routine.

2012-03-24_KSCY-1896_rgbWorking out doesn’t always mean you have to leave your kids at home. Family bike rides or after-dinner walks are easy ways to gradually establish a family workout routine. Jacksonville offers a number of bike and walking trails for hours of family fun in the great outdoors. If you prefer indoor activities, all Y locations offer a safe and fun environment for the whole family, from teenagers to toddlers.

Enjoy family gymnastics and dance classes at your neighborhood Y for an entertaining and enjoyable experience. Or take advantage of the Y’s KidZone—a place where kids can play while you get your workout. The newly renovated Flagler Y also added an area specifically designed for older kids to play basketball, foosball, Xbox and more.

You may be surprised by how much exercise you get by chasing your toddler around on the playground. The increased popularity of personal trackers, such as the Fitbit, has made measuring your activity levels easier than ever. Keep in mind, the suggested 30 minutes of exercise does not have to be completed at one time, but rather, can be split into several segments throughout the day.

To help you squeeze workouts into your family schedule and track your fitness goals, you can now sync your Fitbit to My Y On Demand—the Y’s first ever virtual membership that provides you access to workout videos, personalized meal plans, wellness challenges, and group exercise meet-ups.

If you prefer a more traditional method, every Y branch offers personal trainers who can work with you to customize your exercise. From creating a fitness plan for a beginner to more in-depth training for a seasoned veteran, they are dedicated to bringing you one step closer to your goals.

Being a healthy mom is about making exercise work for you and your kids! By incorporating a few or all of the tips above, 2016 can be the year of a healthier, happier family.

Becoming a mom changes your priorities – suddenly the needs of your children come first, and your exercise routine moves to the bottom of the ever-growing to-do list. Fortunately, there are ways to ensure your personal fitness needs are met, as well as the needs of your family. Daily exercise is important to promote good health. The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, five days per week. In addition to promoting your overall health, a regular workout can provide you with more energy and reduced stress. Physical activity is also an opportunity to spend time with family. You don’t have to choose between being a mom and being healthy, you can be a healthy mom! Here are a few tips for incorporating exercise into your family’s daily routine. Working out doesn’t always mean you have to leave your kids at home. Family bike rides or after-dinner walks are easy ways to…


January 25, 2016

Y Embarks on its First National Advertising Campaign

The New York Times – January 25, 2016

The Y.M.C.A. — or the Y as it is now known — has existed for more than 160 years and has never felt the need to advertise. After all, even without the help of the ubiquitous song from the Village People, most people know what the Y is.

Or they think they do. Concern that the public has misconceptions about the Y’s mission and programs has spurred the nonprofit to undertake its first national advertising campaign.

On Sunday night during “60 Minutes” on CBS, the Y unveiled two commercials as part of a rebranding effort that aims both to change the way the public perceives the organization and to raise money.

“Lots of people know and like the Y,” said Kevin Washington, the president of the Y-USA. “But they see it as a gym and swim place. We’re also a charity, and that is the missing ingredient. We want people to realize that we’re deserving of their charitable donations.”

Filmed outside Baltimore, the commercials both have 30-second and 60-second versions, and they are scheduled to run on major networks, sports stations and lifestyle channels.

While the Y has run public service announcements over the years, this is its first paid national advertising campaign.

In the first, a spot called “Places,” the camera pans over a low-income neighborhood and then pulls in. A voice-over says, “I’m here — can you see me? I feel like I’m invisible, like this whole place is invisible. If it weren’t for the nightly news, no one would even think of this place.”

The voice continues: “But down here things look different. Spirits are bright and our dreams are vivid.” Children are shown playing and riding bikes. Teenagers talk on a stoop. And then come shots of young people being engaged in a classroom at the Y, receiving counsel from an adult and diving into a pool.

The tag line: “When communities are forgotten, the Y remembers.”

In the second commercial, called “Idle Hands,” the tone is more ominous. A narrator intones, “Idle hands, they say they’re the devil’s workshop. Easy targets. Quick to kill time.” There are shots of children looking bored, wasting time and play fighting. Then students are shown working on crafts and other projects at a Y.

At the end of both commercials are reminders that the Y offers “safe spaces, after-school programs, mentorship, meal programs” and more. Then there is an appeal for contributions.

David Droga, the founder of the agency Droga5, which created the commercials, said he, like many people, had a “one-dimensional view of what the Y has to offer.” He added, “We have to rock people out of familiar territory.”

The organization’s effort to change its image began in 2010, and it included changing the logo and shortening the official name to the Y. The group also began highlighting the variety of programs it offers and its role as a community actor, an effort that it hopes the commercials will continue. The organization declined to say how much it was spending on the campaign.

Yet despite its need to compete for funding, the Y said its annual revenue had increased 31.5 percent over the last 10 years to $6.6 billion; about one-third comes from membership dues and the rest from program fees, the government, and contributions from individuals and foundations. The Y was listed as the sixth-largest in the Forbes 2015 ranking of the 50 largest charities in the United States. It is also serving more members. The organization said its nationwide membership was 22 million and that since 2000, the number of branches had increased by 11 percent to over 2,700.

Some branches have struggled financially, and some in cities, including WashingtonAmarillo, Tex.; and Jackson, Miss., have been forced to close.

Nathalie Laidler-Kylander, a lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School who is familiar with aspects of the Y’s rebranding, said it was important for older, established nonprofits to make sure public perception was in line with the organization’s current actions and goals. “For example, the Girl Scouts did a nice job of refocusing on women’s empowerment,” she said.

The campaign also has an interactive online component that will appear on the digital version of The New York Times beginning next month. For example, next to an article about obesity, an ad for the Y may appear, saying, “Help Make This News Better,” and promoting a relevant Y program, such as one for diabetes prevention. Readers will be given a number to text to donate.

The Y’s campaign appears to be addressing “what’s happening on the ground in today’s communities,” according to Aria Finger, the chief executive of Dosomething.org, a New York nonprofit that helps young people take action for social change. She added: “It’s not sugarcoated and it’s showcasing solutions.”

Josh Baran, chief executive of Baran Strategies, an agency that has run many cause-related campaigns, said the commercials showed “why the Y is relevant in the 21st century.”

“The big challenge, though, is that they can’t abandon what seems to be a main source of their income — the gym and swim,” he said. “They have to say, ‘But we’re all these other things as well.’ ”

Ms. Laidler-Kylander said a significant point was the authenticity about the Y promoting itself for its social responsibility and community work. “For instance, they aren’t just jumping into youth programs,” she said. “They’ve always done that.”

A major question is whether the new advertising will result in more donations.

“The Y seems like one of those institutions that will always be here,” Ms. Finger said. “They need to let people know they won’t be here without your support.”

For more information about how you can give to the Y, click here.

The New York Times – January 25, 2016 The Y.M.C.A. — or the Y as it is now known — has existed for more than 160 years and has never felt the need to advertise. After all, even without the help of the ubiquitous song from the Village People, most people know what the Y is. Or they think they do. Concern that the public has misconceptions about the Y’s mission and programs has spurred the nonprofit to undertake its first national advertising campaign. On Sunday night during “60 Minutes” on CBS, the Y unveiled two commercials as part of a rebranding effort that aims both to change the way the public perceives the organization and to raise money. “Lots of people know and like the Y,” said Kevin Washington, the president of the Y-USA. “But they see it as a gym and swim place. We’re also a charity, and that is the missing ingredient. We want people…


January 4, 2016

Fitness Trends for 2016

Did you catch us on WJXT4 The Local Station last week when we discussed Fitness Trends of 2016? From family workouts to exercising outside and new Barre classes, there’s something for everyone at the Y to try in the New Year!

Did you catch us on WJXT4 The Local Station last week when we discussed Fitness Trends of 2016? From family workouts to exercising outside and new Barre classes, there’s something for everyone at the Y to try in the New Year!


December 28, 2015

Winston Y Construction Update

UPDATE: Construction is on schedule for the new Winston Family YMCA in Riverside. We are looking forward to a late summer 2016 opening. Below is a live feed showing the progress in real-time.

PARKING
We appreciate your patience during the continued construction of the new Winston Family YMCA. Parking will be impacted over the next several weeks as work is done along Jackson Street. Here’s what you can expect:

December 28 – January 6

  • The parking lot behind the Yates Y will have a temporary access drive to allow for accessibility parking and drop off/pick up only. There will be only one way in and out and arrows will be painted to indicate this.
  • Parking will be available in the lot across the street from the Yates Y and in an overflow lot at Haskell. A pedestrian walk will be available for crossing over Jackson Street.
  • To ensure the best experience possible, additional signs and painted arrows will indicate flow of traffic. Also, road flag workers will be on site daily to help direct traffic.

Revised Phase II Traffic Plan

Please follow all posted parking and pedestrian detour signs and other notices regarding construction activities and safety information. As we learn of any parking changes, we will update this information as soon as possible. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, we are happy to help in any way we can.

ABOUT THE NEW WINSTON FAMILY YMCA

The new facility will be 72,000 square feet, about 8,000 square feet bigger than the current Yates Y, which was built in the 1950s. Other amenities in the new Winston Y include:

  • 12,000 square foot fitness area with an indoor running track
  • Indoor lap pool will be 25 meters long with six lanes
  • Second, warmer pool will be for children’s swim lessons and other classes
  • Lobby cafe
  • Two spiritual wellness centers for prayer, meditation or just a quiet place
  • Luther and Blanche Healthy Living Center in partnership with Florida Blue, Baptist Health and Brooks Rehabilitation

On a fundraising goal of $21M, we only need $2.5M, but we’ll need YOU to help us cross the finish line! To help us make a difference, contact Nekita Nesmith at nnesmith@firstcoastymca.org.

[WRGF id=29688]

UPDATE: Construction is on schedule for the new Winston Family YMCA in Riverside. We are looking forward to a late summer 2016 opening. Below is a live feed showing the progress in real-time. PARKING We appreciate your patience during the continued construction of the new Winston Family YMCA. Parking will be impacted over the next several weeks as work is done along Jackson Street. Here’s what you can expect: December 28 – January 6 The parking lot behind the Yates Y will have a temporary access drive to allow for accessibility parking and drop off/pick up only. There will be only one way in and out and arrows will be painted to indicate this. Parking will be available in the lot across the street from the Yates Y and in an overflow lot at Haskell. A pedestrian walk will be available for crossing over Jackson Street. To ensure the best experience possible, additional signs and painted…


Mission Statement: To put Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.